French Topical Essays

French

Academic Representatives:

Christine Cano, Associate Professor of French
216-368-4888

Gilbert Doho, Associate Professor of French  and Francophone Studies
216-368-4885

Marie Lathers, Treuhaft Professor of French and Humanities
216-368-8983

Cheryl Toman, Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies
216-368-2233

For French and Francophone Studies, click HERE

Discover the Francophone community and discover the world!
The French language is represented on all five continents and is spoken by more than 90 million people world-wide. French is the working language or second language of numerous international organizations including the United Nations, the International Red Cross, and the European Union. A command of the French language and a knowledge of French culture are increasingly indispensable to those interested in European culture and history; science and technology; literature and the arts; and Middle Eastern, West African, and North American Studies.

Why Study French?
The French program at CWRU takes a global approach to French in its broadest context, and our curriculum reflects the diversity of the Francophone cultures of Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, North America, and elsewhere. Students who wish to major in French choose between the French major and the French and Francophone Studies major. Both options stress proficiency in the French language and encourage students to strive for some mastery of oral and written language skills throughout the program of study. The French major is designed for students who wish to focus primarily on literature and culture (film and the arts), while the Francophone Studies major is interdisciplinary in nature and allows students to pursue additional areas of interest. All students are strongly encouraged to study abroad in order to experience Francophone culture first hand. The Department has its own summer study abroad program in Paris, offered in alternate years, and a summer study abroad program in Cameroon.  We  also offer a spring break trip to Montreal (FRCH 208).”

Bachelor of Arts in French

MAJOR (for B.A.) HOURS 30-32
Students who begin the major at the 200 level:
FRCH 201 and 202; eight 300 level courses in French; two of these may be related courses.

Students who begin the major at the 300 level:
Ten 300 level courses in French; two of these may be related courses.

Related courses are those outside the French offerings that are closely related to French culture: Art History, Classics, History, Philosophy, etc. See the list of French Studies approved courses, available from the academic representative. Study abroad is highly recommended.

Multi-Age Licensure, French
Completion of required French and Education courses. For information, contact Professor Christine Cano, the representative for Teacher Licensure in French.

MINOR HOURS 15-19
Students beginning study in French at the introductory level:
FRCH 101, 102, 201, 202, and one 300 level course (19 hours)
Students beginning study in French at 200 level or higher:
Five FRCH courses at the 200 or 300 level, as approved by the adviser.

HUMANITIES SEQUENCE (for B.S. based on Engineering Core) HOURS 9-12
A. Students with no high school preparation in French: FRCH 101, 102, 201
B. Students with the equivalent of one year of college French: FRCH 201, 202, and one 300 level course
C. Students with the equivalent of two years of college French: Three 300 level courses

INTEGRATED GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM
The Program in French participates in the Integrated Graduate Studies Program, which makes it possible to complete both a B.A. and an M.A. in French within about five years of full-time study. The department particularly recommends the program to qualified students who are interested in seeking admission to highly-competitive professional schools or Ph.D. programs. Interested students should note the general requirements and the admission procedures of CWRU.

Click here for:
Masters in French

French Course Descriptions

Undergraduate

FRCH 101. Elementary French I. 4 Units.
Emphasizes conversational skills. Students are expected to achieve control of sound system and basic sentence structures of French. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to scheduled class meetings.

FRCH 102. Elementary French II. 4 Units.
Continuation of FRCH 101. Recommended preparation: FRCH 101.

FRCH 201. Intermediate French I. 4 Units.
Intensive review of grammar and usage through readings, discussions and other activities that emphasize contemporary French life. Students must complete assignments at the Online Language Learning Center in addition to scheduled class meetings. Recommended preparation: FRCH 102 or equivalent.

FRCH 202. Intermediate French II. 4 Units.

A continuation of FRCH 201, the course focuses on the acquisition of intermediate-level skills in language and culture. Students must complete assignments at the Online Language Learning Center in addition to scheduled class meetings. Recommended preparation: FRCH 201 or equivalent.

FRCH 208. The Montreal Experience. 1 Unit.
One-week immersion learning experience performing community service in Montreal, Canada. Students meet several times for orientation before spending spring break in French-speaking Montreal. Community service may include volunteering in a homeless center, a hospital, or school. Application available from Department office. This course may be repeated once. Permit required. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 295. The Francophone World. 3 Units.
The course offers an introduction to the Francophone World from a historical, cultural, and literary perspective. The Francophone World includes countries and regions around the globe with a substantial French-speaking population (and where French is sometimes, but not always, an official language): North America (Louisiana, Quebec, and Acadia); North Africa (Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and Egypt); the Middle-East (Lebanon, Syria); the Caribbean (Martinique, Guadeloupe, Haiti); South-East Asia (Vietnam); and Europe (France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Luxembourg). FRCH 295 provides a comprehensive overview of the Francophone World, while focusing on a particular area or areas in any given semester. Offered as ETHS 295, FRCH 295, and WLIT 295.

FRCH 308. The Paris Experience. 3 Units.
Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Prereq: FRCH 202.
FRCH 310. Advanced Composition and Reading. 3 Units.
An initiation to the literature of Francophone expression with a focus on close reading. Texts may include short stories, essays, and novels. Students engage in the discussion of their readings and learn how to express their ideas both orally and in written form. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 311. Advanced Conversation I. 3 Units.
Designed to enhance pronunciation, speaking and listening-comprehension through the discussion of French literature and media for children. Required for Teacher Licensure candidates. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 312. Advanced Conversation II. 3 Units.
A functional approach to conversation. Students work to develop fluency in spoken French using current colloquial vocabulary and focusing on current issues. Practice in using speech appropriate to a variety of situations, including public debates. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 314. Translation Techniques. 3 Units.
Contrastive grammar analysis and stylistics are used to foster linguistic awareness and to introduce students to the methods and skills of translation. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 315. Business French. 3 Units.
Business French is an upper-level course with a focus on the economic life of France and other Francophone countries. Students gain knowledge of the economic structures and the business organization of Francophone countries as they enhance the linguistic skills used in professional communication. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 316. Contemporary France. 3 Units.
A study of contemporary France, this course features discussions and lectures on a variety of topics (geography, political and social life, contemporary culture) to develop factual knowledge about France and a sound understanding of current issues as presented in the media. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 317. French Cinema. 3 Units.
An exploration of modern France, its images and values as presented in French films. French press reviews are used for discussion. A unique linguistic and cultural immersion. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 318. The Origins of France. 3 Units.
Examination through texts, films, and other media of major historical, intellectual, and artistic influences that have shaped the evolution of French civilization. Students will attempt to identify the values and myths that have contributed to the formation of modern France and continue to influence French actions. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 319. Modern France. 3 Units.
A study of France’s political, social and cultural history from the French Revolution to World War II, with emphasis on the events, movements, and people that have shaped Modern France. Highly recommended for students of Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century French culture. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 320. Introduction to French Literature. 3 Units.
Taught in French. An introduction to literary analysis through the study of important works of French literature. Written assignments are designed to develop skills in close reading, to introduce students to literary terminology in French, and to develop a capacity for clear, precise communication of an argument. Classes are discussion-based. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 331. Seventeenth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.
The Age of Classicism, from Racine to Mme de Lafayette. Authors, works and topics may vary. Prereq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 335. Women in Developing Countries. 3 Units.
This course will feature case studies, theory, and literature of current issues concerning women in developing countries primarily of the French-speaking world. Discussion and research topics include matriarchal traditions and FGM in Africa, the Tunisian feminist movement, women, Islam, and tradition in the Middle East, women-centered power structures in India (Kerala, Pondichery), and poverty and women in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Guest speakers and special projects are important elements of the course. Seminar-style format, taught in English, with significant disciplinary writing in English for WGST, ETHS, and some WLIT students, and writing in French for FRCH and WLIT students. Writing assignments include two shorter essays and a substantial research paper. Offered as ETHS 335, FRCH 335, WLIT 335, WGST 335, FRCH 435 and WLIT 435.

FRCH 337. Women in the Arab World. 3 Units.

This is a course that allows students an in-depth look at the diverse women who represent a number of cultures in the Arab world in nations from the Mashrek to the Maghreb. The aim is to study such women through the eyes of leading Arab women theorists who have made an impact not only in their own countries, but also on disciplines intersecting with women’s studies worldwide. Subjects of study include the role of Arab women in their respective societies, in political and economic systems, in education, and in the family in addition to women’s contributions to art, literature, and science. The course will provide an overview of Arab women throughout history, from their origins to their place within recent movements within the Arab Spring and other current world events. As Arab women are Muslim, Christian, and Jewish, views of women within these major world religions will also be taken into account. Discussions via teleconference with students and faculty in academic units of women’s studies in the Arab world are an important component of the course.

FRCH 338. The Cameroon Experience. 3 Units.
Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338/438 or ETHS 338/438. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, WLIT 338, ETHS 438, FRCH 438, and WLIT 438. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 341. Eighteenth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.
Topics from the Age of Enlightenment, from libertinage to revolution. Authors and works may vary. Offered as FRCH 341 and FRCH 441. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 351. Nineteenth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.
Romanticism, realism, and naturalism in the novel and the drama. Authors, works, and topics may vary. Offered as FRCH 351 and FRCH 451. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 361. Twentieth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.
Study of representative novelists (e.g., Proust, Gide, Colette, Sartre, Beauvoir) and playwrights (e.g., Claudel, Beckett, Genet) in historical context. Authors, works, and topics vary. Offered as FRCH 361 and FRCH 461. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 372. Topics in French Drama. 3 Units.
A topical approach to issues and problems specific to drama. Plays, playwrights, aesthetic theories, and historical periods studied in this course may vary. Offered as FRCH 372 and FRCH 472. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 373. The Novel and the Novella. 3 Units.
A study of narrative fiction focused on either the analysis of a particular genre (the novel, the short story) or a particular type of novel (e.g., psychological novel, realist novel, detective novel); the tale (the fantastic tale, the fairytale) or novella. Offered as FRCH 373 and FRCH 473. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 374. Major Writers and Literary Movements. 3 Units.
In-depth study of the work of a major writer, film director, or intellectual figure; or of a significant literary, intellectual, or artistic movement. Approaches, content, and instructor will vary. Offered as FRCH 374 and FRCH 474. Prereq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 375. Francophone Literature. 3 Units.
An examination of Francophone literature focused on the problematics of identity within the colonial and post-colonial context. Writers and works may vary. Offered as FRCH 375 and FRCH 475. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 376. Women Writers. 3 Units.
Examination of important literary texts by French and Francophone women writers. Critical essays are also studied to introduce historical and theoretical perspectives. Offered as FRCH 376 and FRCH 476. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 377. Special Topics. 3 Units.
The special topics course is designed to provide a forum for specific themes or subjects not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Approaches and content will vary. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as FRCH 377 and FRCH 477. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 395. French Literature in Translation. 3 Units.
Topics vary according to student and faculty interest. May include Francophone literature, literature and cinema, women writers, contemporary literature. Counts toward French major only as related course. No knowledge of French required. Offered as FRCH 395, WLIT 395, FRCH 495, and WLIT 495.

FRCH 396. Senior Capstone – French. 3 Units.
The Senior Capstone in French in an independent study project chosen in consultation with a capstone advisor. The capstone project should reflect both the student’s interest within French and/or Francophone Studies and the courses he or she has taken to fulfill the major. The project requires independent research using an approved bibliography and plan of action. In addition to written research, the student will also present the capstone project in a public forum that is agreed upon by the project advisor and the student. Prereq: Senior status required. Major in French required.

FRCH 397. Honors Thesis I. 3 Units.
Intensive study of a literary, linguistic, or cultural topic with a faculty member, leading to the writing of a research paper in French. Limited to senior majors. Permit required.

FRCH 398. Honors Thesis II. 3 Units.
Continuation of FRCH 397. Limited to senior majors. Permit required. Prereq: FRCH 397.

FRCH 399. Independent Study. 1 – 3 Unit.
The course is for students who have special interests and commitments that are not addressed in regular courses, and who wish to work independently.

Graduate

FRCH 408. The Paris Experience. 3 Units.
Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Prereq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 435. Women in Developing Countries. 3 Units.
This course will feature case studies, theory, and literature of current issues concerning women in developing countries primarily of the French-speaking world. Discussion and research topics include matriarchal traditions and FGM in Africa, the Tunisian feminist movement, women, Islam, and tradition in the Middle East, women-centered power structures in India (Kerala, Pondichery), and poverty and women in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Guest speakers and special projects are important elements of the course. Seminar-style format, taught in English, with significant disciplinary writing in English for WGST, ETHS, and some WLIT students, and writing in French for FRCH and WLIT students. Writing assignments include two shorter essays and a substantial research paper. Offered as ETHS 335, FRCH 335, WLIT 335, WGST 335, FRCH 435 and WLIT 435.

FRCH 438. The Cameroon Experience. 3 Units.
Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338/438 or ETHS 338/438. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, WLIT 338, ETHS 438, FRCH 438, and WLIT 438.

FRCH 441. Eighteenth Century French Literature. 3 Units.
Topics from the Age of Enlightenment, from libertinage to revolution. Authors and works may vary. Offered as FRCH 341 and FRCH 441.
FRCH 451. Nineteenth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.
Romanticism, realism, and naturalism in the novel and the drama. Authors, works, and topics may vary. Offered as FRCH 351 and FRCH 451.

FRCH 461. Twentieth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.
Study of representative novelists (e.g., Proust, Gide, Colette, Sartre, Beauvoir) and playwrights (e.g., Claudel, Beckett, Genet) in historical context. Authors, works, and topics vary. Offered as FRCH 361 and FRCH 461.

FRCH 472. Topics in French Drama. 3 Units.
A topical approach to issues and problems specific to drama. Plays, playwrights, aesthetic theories, and historical periods studied in this course may vary. Offered as FRCH 372 and FRCH 472.

FRCH 473. The Novel and the Novella. 3 Units.
A study of narrative fiction focused on either the analysis of a particular genre (the novel, the short story) or a particular type of novel (e.g., psychological novel, realist novel, detective novel); the tale (the fantastic tale, the fairytale) or novella. Offered as FRCH 373 and FRCH 473.

FRCH 474. Major Writers and Literary Movements. 3 Units.
In-depth study of the work of a major writer, film director, or intellectual figure; or of a significant literary, intellectual, or artistic movement. Approaches, content, and instructor will vary. Offered as FRCH 374 and FRCH 474. Prereq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 475. Francophone Literature. 3 Units.
An examination of Francophone literature focused on the problematics of identity within the colonial and post-colonial context. Writers and works may vary. Offered as FRCH 375 and FRCH 475.

FRCH 476. Women Writers. 3 Units.
Examination of important literary texts by French and Francophone women writers. Critical essays are also studied to introduce historical and theoretical perspectives. Offered as FRCH 376 and FRCH 476.

FRCH 477. Special Topics. 3 Units.
The special topics course is designed to provide a forum for specific themes or subjects not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Approaches and content will vary. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as FRCH 377 and FRCH 477.

FRCH 495. French Literature in Translation. 3 Units.
Topics vary according to student and faculty interest. May include Francophone literature, literature and cinema, women writers, contemporary literature. Counts toward French major only as related course. No knowledge of French required. Offered as FRCH 395, WLIT 395, FRCH 495, and WLIT 495. Coreq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 590. Seminar: Topics in Modern Literature and Culture. 3 Units.
French literature and culture since the Revolution of 1789. Topics vary depending on student and instructor interests; may include realism and naturalism, Proust, contemporary film, or French philosophy. Maximum 9 credits. Prereq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 595. Independent Research. 1 – 3 Unit.
Graded independent work on a literary topic arranged individually with the instructor. Prereq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 601. Independent Study. 1 – 18 Unit.
For individual students or larger groups with special interests.

FRCH 651. Thesis M.A.. 6 – 9 Units.
Thesis M.A. serves the graduate plan A of the Graduate Handbook.

CWRU General Bulletin

Course rationale

The Modern Languages and Linguistics Department at UMBC is dedicated to the teaching of Foreign Languages in their cultural context. Thus, in the French Area, we believe that our students should interact, via authentic documents, with French-speakin g society in its daily reality.
French 303 is a special topic course whose purpose is to create the instructional modules that guide the students through different aspects of the French society or the Francophone world of today. French 303 will help the students explore the meaning of growing up in France in 1996.
Effective culture-based French courses on modern French society should take advantage of the information-transfer systems provided by the latest technologies: satellite TV, and current video texts, but also the new information databases offered through I nternet.
Focusing on French Youth Today, this course will also address some methodological problems that the student frequently encounters when using authentic FL documents .

Target population

French 303 is a "special topic" undergraduate course designed for implementation in the French Language program at UMBC. It is suitable for participants who:

  • have completed French 301;
  • have taken as required classes or electives other 300 level or above courses;
  • possess a high level of competency in French.

Course description

In this French 303 course, you will learn about the environment and the value systems that French young people hold today. This course is built on different modules corresponding to specific topics such as family, health, relationships, education, the jo b market, but also entertainment, sports and leisure.
This course will be based mostly on very current authentic documents: newspaper and magazine articles, video texts or TV programming, and the World-Wide Web.

specific initial requirements

A basic training in E-mail and Internet navigation is necessary. The first two initial sessions will be conducted by the Center for Language Initiative technician and myself.
At the end of these two sessions, you will be requested to:

  • get an E-mail address if you don't have one already
  • subscribe to Frognet. This will allow you to receive daily the RFI (Radio France Internationale) news feed with the Press review of the day.


Notes about the Internet

French 303 should have launched its home page by mid-January. This home page, easily accessible, will be your gateway to the Net. A series of Hyperlinks will connect you to a selection of French servers.
Our technical assistant will explain basic procedures and offer a "Hands on" session on how to navigate on the Net, to download materials, to save documents as text files, or to print a hardcopy for immediate use. Technical guidance will be available thr oughout the entire semester.
Computers stations are available in the Multimedia Center. The Center director, Joan Costello, can provide assistance with any questions and/or difficulties you may have.

Required text:

Welcomme, Geneviève & Willerval, Claire (1994) Juniorscopie. Paris: Larousse, 1993.

Class schedule:

French 303 will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10:00 am to 11:15 am.

Attendance policy:

Participants are expected to attend every class and are also expected to arrive on time, so that we may start promptly. If you must miss a session, you are expected to let me know in advance. You may do so by leaving a message at the MLL office or by se nding an E-mail message to my box.

Grading policy:

All assignments should be turned in on time. Late assignments will be marked down one letter grade for each week they are late. There will be no incomplete given in this class.

Participant Evaluation:

Your grade will be computed as follows:
Participation and attendance: 20%
Oral presentation: 15%
Portfolio: 25%
Written report: 25%
Article: 15%

Communications:

Office: 148B ACIV
Office phone: 455-2600
Main office phone: 455- 2109
E-Mail: devernei @ gl.umbc.edu

2

Terminal objectives


After completion of French 303 special Topic, French Youth Today, participants should be
able to:

? when given a topic to analyze on today's France, locate without any hesitation five different sources of current authentic documents. These five sources must include both electronic and at least three other kinds of information data systems.

? once initiated to accessing Internet and when given a topic to analyze on French Youth today, identify the location of proper information on at least 5 different Internet sites. Pertinent data means any data that directly relates or inter relates with the given topic.

? once initiated to accessing Internet and E-mail, demonstrate the proper use of authentic documents by preparing a portfolio on at least one topic of choice. The portfolio must be 50 pages long, reflect at least five different s ources of materials, five different Internet sites and be organized in sub-topics.

? when given an authentic text, decode the terminology specific to authentic documents without having to rely on a dictionary. To be satisfactory, the decoding must be correct at least 7 at of 10 times.

? when doing an oral presentation, explain verbally at least 4 aspects of a topic of choice in the context of France today. This presentation must be concise and short (no more than 12 minutes) and the aspects chosen must be essential to th e topic.

? given any writing support materials necessary, demonstrate thematic comprehension by writing a short essay on different but interrelated topics on French Youth today (e.g. education and the work place). The essay shou ld be 5-6 pages long. It should include an introduction, a cross-topic reflexion and a conclusion.

? given any writing support materials necessary and the opportunity to self correct, demonstrate information processing skills by writing a short publishable article on the topic of choice (4-5 pages). This article should be error free at a rate of 90% or above and include terminology typically used with authentic documents.

course structure

French 303 French Youth Today relies heavily on videotexts as means of teaching thematic features. Thus, the course is divided in modules which , for the most part, articulate around videotexts designed to build up the semantic background ne cessary to any topical study.. Each module represents one week workload. Every other week, we will read one newspaper or magazine article on the topic under discussion.
At the beginning of each class, we will briefly discuss the current socio-polical events reported from Radio France Internationale and read daily on Frognet.
At the end of the semester, you will present an exposé of a topic of your choice in the context of France today.

special features

Module I, " getting started"
has been specially designed to help you through a few technical aspects involved with using E-mail and Internet.
It will also help you to learn how to process authentic documents in French.


4

evaluation


your portfolio

At the beginning of the semester, you will choose one topic of choice
among the topics studied in class. All semester long, you will gather various documents that will constitute your research background information..

To receive full credit, this portfolio must contain:

  • authentic current documents coming from at least five different sources. This may include precise references to a satellite show with a short resume of its contents.
  • printed information from at least five different Internet sites
  • relevant information only. Relevant information means information that directly addresses your topic or explains how your topic is being affected by another topic.
  • other information you feel is important to have
  • This portfolio should consist of at least 50 pages, be organized in sub-topics and should be used as background information for both written and oral assigments. It is due the last day of class.

your written report

This project will help you contextualize your topic in two ways: within the setting of French society and in relationship to at least another topic. Exemple, with Health as a chosen topic, one may select to study : family and health issues, education an d health, health and leisure, etc. This written report must include an introduction, a cross-topic reflexion and a conclusion.
This paper should be at least 5 to 6 pages long, 12pt font and double spaced.
It will be due on the last day of class.

your oral presentation

Each student will present his/her research in the chosen topic in class.
To get full credit, this presentation will explain at least 4 different and essential aspects of the topic in the context of France today. Your oral presentation map must be put on a tranparent. You will also provide one resume sheet that will be distributed to other participants. Your presentation should last between 10 and 12 minutes and will take place in Module 12-13.

your article

In order to synthesize what has been learned in this course, you will write a short publishable article on your topic of choice. This article should be at least 4-5 pages long. It will give a precise description and analysis of your subject in the 1996 France and use terminology specific to authentic documents.

You must use computer-assisted writing tools such as Système D ( a software program that facilitates the process of writing in French) or any other means to control the quality of this article. The end product should be basically error free (only 10% mistakes allowed).
This paper will be due at the end of module 11. I will read and underline mistakes to let you rewrite another version if you so choose. This last version will be due on the last day of class.
The best papers will be published on the course home page..




 



 

5

syllabus


Week one
Module 1: Getting started

Using E-mail; accessing the Net; the authentic document
Homework: 1. Read daily the RFI news and be ready to answer questions on your
next class.
2. Read in Juniorscopie pp. 8- 16 ; pp. 50-58
Handout: 3. Read "sans pères et sans repères", Le Nouvel Observateur du 2-8 novembre 1995.


Week two
Module 2: Topic: Family structures

A. Introduction. Video: Family ties.
B. Focus: analysis and discussion of "sans père et sans repères".
Homework: 1. Read daily the RFI news.
2. Read in Juniorscopie, pp. 18-45.
Hand out: 3. Read in L'Express, November 3 1994 " Les canettes du désespoir", p.31.


Week three
Module 3: Topic: Health issues

A. Introduction. Video: contraception and Aids prevention in secondary schools .
B. Video: on substance abuse.
Homework: 1. Read daily the RFI news.
2. Read Juniorscopie, pp- 64-68.
Handout: 3. Read " Le doc: Parlez-leur d'amour", pp 24-27.


Week four
Module 4: Topic: On relationships.

A. Video: on love and relationships.
B. Focus: analysis and discussion of "parlez-leur d'amour".
Homework: Read RFI news.
Read in Juniorscopie : "l'après-bac", pp.130-132.



Week five

Module 5: Topic: The Education system I

A. Video: the university in question
B. Video: the CIP (Post High School diplomas and the government reform)
Homework: Read RFI news.
Handouts: Read in L'Express, November 3 1994, pp. 36-40.
Read in Le Point, " La vérité qui fait peur", 25 novembre 1995, pp.30-34.


Week six
Module 6: Topic: The Education system II

A. Video: Young people speak to the government
B. Focus: Higher education in crisis. Analysis and discussion of "la vérité qui fait peur".
Homework: Read RFI news.
Handout: Read Le Figaro Magazine," ce qu'attendent les jeunes", pp. 40-44.


Week seven
Module 7: Topic: the economic factor

A. Video: social crisis
B. Video: the suburbs
Homework: Read RFI news.
Handouts: Read in Le Nouvel Observateur, June 21 1995, pp. 4-12.
November 8, 1995 pp.4-9


Week eight
Module 8: Topic: Value system/ beliefs I

A. Video: l'Islam en France
B. Video: Taize
Homework: Read RFI news.
Read in Juniorscopie, pp. 159-166.
Read "les voies de la citoyenneté". L'Express, November 3, 1994, pp.33-35.

Week nine
Module 9: Topic: Value system/ beliefs II

A. Video: the national service
B. Focus: French attitudes on politics . Analysis and discussion of "les voies de la citoyenneté"
Homework: Read RFI news.


Week ten
Module 10: Topic: "Speaking young"

A. Video: the language of Youth
B. Text: "Une pouffe de notre temps" (Le Nouvel Observateur du 16-22 novembre 1995).
Homework: Read RFI news.
Read in Juniorscopie, pp. 181-203.

Week eleven
Module 11. Topic: "Leisures"

A. Audiotext: Renaud dans "Laisse béton"
B. Video: some French singers
Homework: Read RFI news.

your article's first draft is due


Week twelve
Module 12:
Class presentations
Homework: Read RFI news.

Week Thirteen
Module 13:
Class presentations
Homework: Read RFI news.

Week fourteen
Module 14:
Conclusion and comments



your portfolio, your written report and article's final version are due.


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