Essay On Small Scale And Cottage Industries From Afghanistan

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INDIAN COTTAGE INDUSTRY


Size of the INDUSTRY Spread all around the country with Textile, Cotton and other handicrafts items.
Geographical distribution Rajasthan, Pune, Gujarat, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Bangalore
Output per annumIt accounts for more than 12 billion per annum


History
The real India resides in Rural India. Large portion of the rural population of India acting as one of the major sources of its economy is supported by Cottage Industries which is responsible for having hugely preserved the cultural heritage of India. Cottage Industry not only maintains a distinct identity of its own but also provides it with a unique platform to display its specialty when there is a tough competition faced in the international markets. It is only because of Cottage Industries the indigenous goods can fairly compete with the foreign goods due to the impression of Indian culture that makes them unique.

Cottage industries or the small scale industries (SSIs) are usually the terms used for small business carried on at home involving less number of people as laborers who may or may not be the members of one family and sometimes, such a production or manufacturing of goods involves the traditional artisans and craftsmen who have inherited their work as an art form from their ancestors. Their various goods produced include dress fabrics such as khadi, wool, muslin, leather, silk, cotton etc, & many precious items like jewellery, ornaments, statues, idols, gems, stones, etc and also edible items like spices, oils, honey, etc have a huge demand not only within India but also in the foreign markets.

Since ancient times in the country such indigenous products have always been able to attract foreign traders and merchants. These helped India in successfully establishing trade relations with the Greek, Chinese and Arab merchants. Even during the period of medieval India, Indian craftsmen and artisans flourished well under the rule of the Turk, Afghan and Mughal dynasties. But from the advent of the East India Company, there was a drastic change in the running of these cottage industries. For an urge to have more luxury items at the cheapest prices, the European traders and merchants exploited the Indian peasants to great extent due to which these cottage industries witnessed a severe lash to their production. Later the Industrial revolution in the West also gave a fatal blow to their economy and led to considerable decline in the number.

Although the Gandhji led 'Swadeshi' and the 'Boycott' movements helped in the promotion of khadi and other Indian fabrics, they could not help much in saving the decline in the manufacturing of the items that involved fine work as well as an artistic taste. Since 1947, after Indian independence there was a much-needed change that was introduced in the country for the improvement of the economic condition of India. As a consequence of which, the cottage industries were neglected again but later they became an integral part of India's five-year plans.

Since then today after several years of Indian independence, the contemporary condition of the small scale industries is under control more than ever before. They are operated with a joint co-operation of the public and the private sectors. Today every state in India has its own set of cottage industries whose art and craft items depict the traditional art form and the culture of that particular state.

Cottage Industries have proved to be well for those who were self-employed or unemployed by providing them with the means to earn their livelihood. Government of India on October 2,1993 launched The "Prime Minister's Rodger Yolanda Scheme",(PMRYS) for the educated but unemployed youth and for providing them with self-employment ventures in Industries, Services, Business, etc. Today it provides them with training in the Government recognized or government- approved institutions. Under the Ninth Five-year Plan Period, a target of training 90,500 persons was made out of which 68,525 persons were actually trained and 73,672 applications were sanctioned for providing financial assistance to the tune of Rs. 380.84 cores and an amount of Rs. 297.21 cores was actually dispersed to 59,578 applicants.

Under the Government's Tenth Five-year Plan, the areas identified for the development of SSIs are Leather and Leather products, Textiles and Readymade Garments, Gems and Jewellery, Pharmaceuticals, Information Technology, Bio-Technology, Automobile Componenta, Food Processing, Coir Industries, etc.

Introduction of Market Development Assistance scheme (MDA), Entrepreneur Development Institute (E.D.I.), State Industries Centers - EDP Training, Women Entrepreneur Development Programme, Construction of DIC building, maintenance, contribution to specific fund (TTM), Assistance to Coir Industrial Co-operative Societies, assistance for setting up of Industries (Capital Investment Subsidy to SSI Units) etc, has made it possible for the cottage industries to flourish well.
Brief Introduction
Indian Cottage industry is generally unorganized sector and falls under the category of small scale industry. The industry produces consumable products through the use of conventional methods. Such type of industries originates usually in the country sides where unemployment and under-employment are widespread. The Cottage Industries faces major risks from medium or large industries which demand huge amount of capital investment for all types of hi-end technologies. Indian Cottage Industries are destined to play a significant role in the economic development of the country while keeping in view the potential for employment generation, preservation of cultural heritage and the dispersal of industrial activity into the backward regions.

In recent past Cottage industry has played a commendable role in the economic development of the Jammu and Kashmir State, as it affords great potential for exports and employment generation. The industry is particularly an export-oriented as more than 90% of its total production is exported to many foreign countries.

Every region in our country abounds in beautiful handicrafts, handlooms, carpets, etc. Freedom Tree attempts to help keep some of these crafts in the limelight by sourcing its products from rural artisans and craftsmen across the country. It features Indian culture in a very unique way and helps preserve it by marketing products which are hand made.

Freedom Tree celebrates India though its vibrant and colourful designs. The Freedom Tree Design store's products have an impression of our cultural heritage imbibed into them that makes them unique. With its focus on promoting Indian craftsmanship, Freedom Tree Design store has a host of ceramic, textile and lacquer ware products that are all made in India and have a global appeal to them. The products are designed and made by hand, making each one a unique piece.
Employment opportunities
Another major occupation in Indian villages other than agriculture in India is the cottage industry. This industry has emerged as a major source of employment in Indian villages over the period of time. Many people are involved in various kinds of art and crafts works. The villagers produce different types of handicrafts products and many of them are earning their livelihoods by marketing them. The occupations like artisan in pottery, wood, cloth, metal and leather have been in existence in Indian villages, since the ancient period and are found even in the modern times. Many Indian villagers are dependent on these occupations to earn their livelihoods.
Latest developments
  • Indian Cottage industries provide opportunity for the development of handicrafts in the country. In places like KONDAPALLI and NIRMAL hand- made toys are the main occupation for the people.
  • The LEPAKSHI sarees are famous and dyeing is a prominent in the industry. In many villages match boxes are made all around the country. Carpets are also are part of cottage industries.
  • With the advent of the British cottage industries in our country suffered a setback. Industrial revolution brought about a craze for goods made on machines. People depending on cottage industries lost their livelihood. After independence cottage industries are again encouraged. Government now provides the needed financial assistance to these. Product of cottages industries are sold through special counters like the LEPAKSHI stalls.

 Recent Press Release


  INDIAN cottage Industry AT A Glance IN 2011 - 2012

Indian Industries

Classified under RED categoryAluminium industry, Cement industry, Construction industry, Copper industry, Dairy industry, Diamond industry, Fashion industry, Fertilizer industry, Film industry, Granite industry, Health care industry, Jewellery industry, Mining industry, Oil industry, Paint industry, Paper industry, Power industry, Printing industry, Rubber industry, Silk industry, Soap industry, Steel industry, Sugar industry, Textile industry, Tabacco industry, Zinc industry
Classified under ORANGE categoryAutomobile industry, Cotton industry, Hotel industry, Jute industry, Pharmaceutical industry, Tractor industry, Weaving industry
Classified under GREEN categoryAdvertising industry, Agricultural industry, Aviation industry, Banking industry, Biotechnology industry, Biscuit industry, Chocolate industry, Coir industry, Cosmetic industry, Cottage industry, Electronic industry, Food Processing industry, Furniture industry, Garment industry, Insurance industry, IT industry, Leather industry, Music industry, Mutual fund industry, Pearl industry, Plastic industry, Poultry industry, Railway industry, Real estate industry, Shipping industry, Solar industry


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Browse issues
  1. 1960sI/1 – I/58
    1. 1960I/1 – I/6
      1. NLR I/1, January-February 1960
      2. NLR I/2, March-April 1960
      3. NLR I/3, May-June 1960
      4. NLR I/4, July-August 1960
      5. NLR I/5, September-October 1960
      6. NLR I/6, November-December 1960
    2. 1961I/7 – I/12
      1. NLR I/7, January-February 1961
      2. NLR I/8, March-April 1961
      3. NLR I/9, May-June 1961
      4. NLR I/10, July-August 1961
      5. NLR I/11, September-October 1961
      6. NLR I/12, November-December 1961
    3. 1962I/13-14 – I/17
      1. NLR I/13-14, January-April 1962
      2. NLR I/15, May-June 1962
      3. NLR I/16, July-August 1962
      4. NLR I/17, Winter 1962
    4. 1963I/18 – I/22
      1. NLR I/18, January-February 1963
      2. NLR I/19, March-April 1963
      3. NLR I/20, Summer 1963
      4. NLR I/21, October 1963
      5. NLR I/22, December 1963
    5. 1964I/23 – I/28
      1. NLR I/23, January-February 1964
      2. NLR I/24, March-April 1964
      3. NLR I/25, May-June 1964
      4. NLR I/26, July-August 1964
      5. NLR I/27, September-October 1964
      6. NLR I/28, November-December 1964
    6. 1965I/29 – I/34
      1. NLR I/29, January-February 1965
      2. NLR I/30, March-April 1965
      3. NLR I/31, May-June 1965
      4. NLR I/32, July-August 1965
      5. NLR I/33, September-October 1965
      6. NLR I/34, November-December 1965
    7. 1966I/35 – I/40
      1. NLR I/35, January-February 1966
      2. NLR I/36, March-April 1966
      3. NLR I/37, May-June 1966
      4. NLR I/38, July-August 1966
      5. NLR I/39, September-October 1966
      6. NLR I/40, November-December 1966
    8. 1967I/41 – I/46
      1. NLR I/41, January-February 1967
      2. NLR I/42, March-April 1967
      3. NLR I/43, May-June 1967
      4. NLR I/44, July-August 1967
      5. NLR I/45, September-October 1967
      6. NLR I/46, November-December 1967
    9. 1968I/47 – I/52
      1. NLR I/47, January-February 1968
      2. NLR I/48, March-April 1968
      3. NLR I/49, May-June 1968
      4. NLR I/50, July-August 1968
      5. NLR I/51, September-October 1968
      6. NLR I/52, November-December 1968
    10. 1969I/53 – I/58
      1. NLR I/53, January-February 1969
      2. NLR I/54, March-April 1969
      3. NLR I/55, May-June 1969
      4. NLR I/56, July-August 1969
      5. NLR I/57, September-October 1969
      6. NLR I/58, November-December 1969
  2. 1970sI/59 – I/118
    1. 1970I/59 – I/64
      1. NLR I/59, January-February 1970
      2. NLR I/60, March-April 1970
      3. NLR I/61, May-June 1970
      4. NLR I/62, July-August 1970
      5. NLR I/63, September-October 1970
      6. NLR I/64, November-December 1970
    2. 1971I/65 – I/70
      1. NLR I/65, January-February 1971
      2. NLR I/66, March-April 1971
      3. NLR I/67, May-June 1971
      4. NLR I/68, July-August 1971
      5. NLR I/69, September-October 1971
      6. NLR I/70, November-December 1971
    3. 1972I/71 – I/76
      1. NLR I/71, January-February 1972
      2. NLR I/72, March-April 1972
      3. NLR I/73, May-June 1972
      4. NLR I/74, July-August 1972
      5. NLR I/75, September-October 1972
      6. NLR I/76, November-December 1972
    4. 1973I/77 – I/82
      1. NLR I/77, January-February 1973
      2. NLR I/78, March-April 1973
      3. NLR I/79, May-June 1973
      4. NLR I/80, July-August 1973
      5. NLR I/81, September-October 1973
      6. NLR I/82, November-December 1973
    5. 1974I/83 – I/87-88
      1. NLR I/83, January-February 1974
      2. NLR I/84, March-April 1974
      3. NLR I/85, May-June 1974
      4. NLR I/86, July-August 1974
      5. NLR I/87-88, September-December 1974
    6. 1975I/89 – I/94
      1. NLR I/89, January-February 1975
      2. NLR I/90, March-April 1975
      3. NLR I/91, May-June 1975
      4. NLR I/92, July-August 1975
      5. NLR I/93, September-October 1975
      6. NLR I/94, November-December 1975
    7. 1976I/95 – I/100
      1. NLR I/95, January-February 1976
      2. NLR I/96, March-April 1976
      3. NLR I/97, May-June 1976
      4. NLR I/98, July-August 1976
      5. NLR I/99, September-October 1976
      6. NLR I/100, November-December 1976
    8. 1977I/101-102 – I/106
      1. NLR I/101-102, January-April 1977
      2. NLR I/103, May-June 1977
      3. NLR I/104, July-August 1977
      4. NLR I/105, September-October 1977
      5. NLR I/106, November-December 1977
    9. 1978I/107 – I/112
      1. NLR I/107, January-February 1978
      2. NLR I/108, March-April 1978
      3. NLR I/109, May-June 1978
      4. NLR I/110, July-August 1978
      5. NLR I/111, September-October 1978
      6. NLR I/112, November-December 1978
    10. 1979I/113-114 – I/118
      1. NLR I/113-114, January-April 1979
      2. NLR I/115, May-June 1979
      3. NLR I/116, July-August 1979
      4. NLR I/117, September-October 1979
      5. NLR I/118, November-December 1979
  3. 1980sI/119 – I/178
    1. 1980I/119 – I/124
      1. NLR I/119, January-February 1980
      2. NLR I/120, March-April 1980
      3. NLR I/121, May-June 1980
      4. NLR I/122, July-August 1980
      5. NLR I/123, September-October 1980
      6. NLR I/124, November-December 1980
    2. 1981I/125 – I/130
      1. NLR I/125, January-February 1981
      2. NLR I/126, March-April 1981
      3. NLR I/127, May-June 1981
      4. NLR I/128, July-August 1981
      5. NLR I/129, September-October 1981
      6. NLR I/130, November-December 1981
    3. 1982I/131 – I/136
      1. NLR I/131, January-February 1982
      2. NLR I/132, March-April 1982
      3. NLR I/133, May-June 1982
      4. NLR I/134, July-August 1982
      5. NLR I/135, September-October 1982
      6. NLR I/136, November-December 1982
    4. 1983I/137 – I/142
      1. NLR I/137, January-February 1983
      2. NLR I/138, March-April 1983
      3. NLR I/139, May-June 1983
      4. NLR I/140, July-August 1983
      5. NLR I/141, September-October 1983
      6. NLR I/142, November-December 1983
    5. 1984I/143 – I/148
      1. NLR I/143, January-February 1984
      2. NLR I/144, March-April 1984
      3. NLR I/145, May-June 1984
      4. NLR I/146, July-August 1984
      5. NLR I/147, September-October 1984
      6. NLR I/148, November-December 1984
    6. 1985I/149 – I/154
      1. NLR I/149, January-February 1985
      2. NLR I/150, March-April 1985
      3. NLR I/151, May-June 1985
      4. NLR I/152, July-August 1985
      5. NLR I/153, September-October 1985
      6. NLR I/154, November-December 1985
    7. 1986I/155 – I/160
      1. NLR I/155, January-February 1986
      2. NLR I/156, March-April 1986
      3. NLR I/157, May-June 1986
      4. NLR I/158, July-August 1986
      5. NLR I/159, September-October 1986
      6. NLR I/160, November-December 1986
    8. 1987I/161 – I/166
      1. NLR I/161, January-February 1987
      2. NLR I/162, March-April 1987
      3. NLR I/163, May-June 1987
      4. NLR I/164, July-August 1987
      5. NLR I/165, September-October 1987
      6. NLR I/166, November-December 1987
    9. 1988I/167 – I/172
      1. NLR I/167, January-February 1988
      2. NLR I/168, March-April 1988
      3. NLR I/169, May-June 1988
      4. NLR I/170, July-August 1988
      5. NLR I/171, September-October 1988
      6. NLR I/172, November-December 1988
    10. 1989I/173 – I/178
      1. NLR I/173, January-February 1989
      2. NLR I/174, March-April 1989
      3. NLR I/175, May-June 1989
      4. NLR I/176, July-August 1989
      5. NLR I/177, September-October 1989
      6. NLR I/178, November-December 1989
  4. 1990sI/179 – I/238
    1. 1990I/179 – I/184
      1. NLR I/179, January-February 1990
      2. NLR I/180, March-April 1990
      3. NLR I/181, May-June 1990
      4. NLR I/182, July-August 1990
      5. NLR I/183, September-October 1990
      6. NLR I/184, November-December 1990
    2. 1991I/185 – I/190
      1. NLR I/185, January-February 1991
      2. NLR I/186, March-April 1991
      3. NLR I/187, May-June 1991
      4. NLR I/188, July-August 1991
      5. NLR I/189, September-October 1991
      6. NLR I/190, November-December 1991
    3. 1992I/191 – I/196
      1. NLR I/191, January-February 1992
      2. NLR I/192, March-April 1992
      3. NLR I/193, May-June 1992
      4. NLR I/194, July-August 1992
      5. NLR I/195, September-October 1992
      6. NLR I/196, November-December 1992
    4. 1993I/197 – I/202
      1. NLR I/197, January-February 1993
      2. NLR I/198, March-April 1993
      3. NLR I/199, May-June 1993
      4. NLR I/200, July-August 1993
      5. NLR I/201, September-October 1993
      6. NLR I/202, November-December 1993
    5. 1994I/203 – I/208
      1. NLR I/203, January-February 1994
      2. NLR I/204, March-April 1994
      3. NLR I/205, May-June 1994
      4. NLR I/206, July-August 1994
      5. NLR I/207, September-October 1994
      6. NLR I/208, November-December 1994
    6. 1995I/209 – I/214
      1. NLR I/209, January-February 1995
      2. NLR I/210, March-April 1995
      3. NLR I/211, May-June 1995
      4. NLR I/212, July-August 1995
      5. NLR I/213, September-October 1995
      6. NLR I/214, November-December 1995
    7. 1996I/215 – I/220
      1. NLR I/215, January-February 1996
      2. NLR I/216, March-April 1996
      3. NLR I/217, May-June 1996
      4. NLR I/218, July-August 1996
      5. NLR I/219, September-October 1996
      6. NLR I/220, November-December 1996
    8. 1997I/221 – I/226
      1. NLR I/221, January-February 1997
      2. NLR I/222, March-April 1997
      3. NLR I/223, May-June 1997
      4. NLR I/224, July-August 1997
      5. NLR I/225, September-October 1997
      6. NLR I/226, November-December 1997
    9. 1998I/227 – I/232
      1. NLR I/227, January-February 1998
      2. NLR I/228, March-April 1998
      3. NLR I/229, May-June 1998
      4. NLR I/230, July-August 1998
      5. NLR I/231, September-October 1998
      6. NLR I/232, November-December 1998
    10. 1999I/233 – I/238
      1. NLR I/233, January-February 1999
      2. NLR I/234, March-April 1999
      3. NLR I/235, May-June 1999
      4. NLR I/236, July-August 1999
      5. NLR I/237, September-October 1999
      6. NLR I/238, November-December 1999
  5. 2000s1 – 60
    1. 20001 – 6
      1. NLR 1, January-February 2000
      2. NLR 2, March-April 2000
      3. NLR 3, May-June 2000
      4. NLR 4, July-August 2000
      5. NLR 5, September-October 2000
      6. NLR 6, November-December 2000
    2. 20017 – 12
      1. NLR 7, January-February 2001
      2. NLR 8, March-April 2001
      3. NLR 9, May-June 2001
      4. NLR 10, July-August 2001
      5. NLR 11, September-October 2001
      6. NLR 12, November-December 2001
    3. 200213 – 18
      1. NLR 13, January-February 2002
      2. NLR 14, March-April 2002
      3. NLR 15, May-June 2002
      4. NLR 16, July-August 2002
      5. NLR 17, September-October 2002
      6. NLR 18, November-December 2002
    4. 200319 – 24
      1. NLR 19, January-February 2003
      2. NLR 20, March-April 2003
      3. NLR 21, May-June 2003
      4. NLR 22, July-August 2003
      5. NLR 23, September-October 2003
      6. NLR 24, November-December 2003
    5. 200425 – 30
      1. NLR 25, January-February 2004
      2. NLR 26, March-April 2004
      3. NLR 27, May-June 2004
      4. NLR 28, July-August 2004
      5. NLR 29, September-October 2004
      6. NLR 30, November-December 2004
    6. 200531 – 36
      1. NLR 31, January-February 2005
      2. NLR 32, March-April 2005
      3. NLR 33, May-June 2005
      4. NLR 34, July-August 2005
      5. NLR 35, September-October 2005
      6. NLR 36, November-December 2005
    7. 200637 – 42
      1. NLR 37, January-February 2006
      2. NLR 38, March-April 2006
      3. NLR 39, May-June 2006
      4. NLR 40, July-August 2006
      5. NLR 41, September-October 2006
      6. NLR 42, November-December 2006
    8. 200743 – 48
      1. NLR 43, January-February 2007
      2. NLR 44, March-April 2007
      3. NLR 45, May-June 2007
      4. NLR 46, July-August 2007
      5. NLR 47, September-October 2007
      6. NLR 48, November-December 2007
    9. 200849 – 54
      1. NLR 49, January-February 2008
      2. NLR 50, March-April 2008
      3. NLR 51, May-June 2008
      4. NLR 52, July-August 2008
      5. NLR 53, September-October 2008
      6. NLR 54, November-December 2008
    10. 200955 – 60
      1. NLR 55, January-February 2009
      2. NLR 56, March-April 2009
      3. NLR 57, May-June 2009
      4. NLR 58, July-August 2009
      5. NLR 59, September-October 2009
      6. NLR 60, November-December 2009
  6. 2010s61 – 108
    1. 201061 – 66
      1. NLR 61, January-February 2010
      2. NLR 62, March-April 2010
      3. NLR 63, May-June 2010
      4. NLR 64, July-August 2010
      5. NLR 65, September-October 2010
      6. NLR 66, November-December 2010
    2. 201167 – 72
      1. NLR 67, January-February 2011
      2. NLR 68, March-April 2011
      3. NLR 69, May-June 2011
      4. NLR 70, July-August 2011
      5. NLR 71, September-October 2011
      6. NLR 72, November-December 2011
    3. 201273 – 78
      1. NLR 73, January-February 2012
      2. NLR 74, March-April 2012
      3. NLR 75, May-June 2012
      4. NLR 76, July-August 2012
      5. NLR 77, September-October 2012
      6. NLR 78, November-December 2012
    4. 201379 – 84
      1. NLR 79, January-February 2013
      2. NLR 80, March-April 2013
      3. NLR 81, May-June 2013
      4. NLR 82, July-August 2013
      5. NLR 83, September-October 2013
      6. NLR 84, November-December 2013
    5. 201485 – 90
      1. NLR 85, January-February 2014
      2. NLR 86, March-April 2014
      3. NLR 87, May-June 2014
      4. NLR 88, July-August 2014
      5. NLR 89, September-October 2014
      6. NLR 90, November-December 2014
    6. 201591 – 96
      1. NLR 91, January-February 2015
      2. NLR 92, March-April 2015
      3. NLR 93, May-June 2015
      4. NLR 94, July-August 2015
      5. NLR 95, September-October 2015
      6. NLR 96, November-December 2015
    7. 201697 – 102
      1. NLR 97, January-February 2016
      2. NLR 98, March-April 2016
      3. NLR 99, May-June 2016
      4. NLR 100, July-August 2016
      5. NLR 101, September-October 2016
      6. NLR 102, November-December 2016
    8. 2017103 – 108
      1. NLR 103, January-February 2017
      2. NLR 104, March-April 2017
      3. NLR 105, May-June 2017
      4. NLR 106, July-August 2017
      5. NLR 107, September-October 2017
      6. NLR 108, November-December 2017

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