Smoking Essay Body

The Effects Of Tobacco On The Human Body

Tobacco use can be linked to many cancers such as lung, throat, mouth, nasal cavity, stomach, pancreatic, kidney, and bladder. Other problems that can be linked to are strokes, heart disease, and bronchitis. In addition, one of the problems after smoking is the inability to become pregnant. Tobacco use kills victims. (Health Effects)
Tobacco is addictive and it is hard to quit. Tobacco has more than 4,000 chemicals in it. Fifty of these cause many types of cancers. Using Tobacco and being pregnant is very lethal to the infant and later the mother. Tobacco slowly kills many adults and children each day. Nursing while smoking can also cause complications to the baby and to others around. (Tobacco Facts)
Tobacco causes multiple deaths every year. The number of deaths in 2010 was 2,468,435. 2010 drug overdose levels were in the thousands. Tobacco has become a serious problem over the years. Because of tobacco, many people have lost their lives. (Annual causes of death in the United States)
Tobacco slowly kills one person every minute. Tobacco isn't just about affecting the smoker but effecting victims of secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke is a problem that comes with smoking tobacco and causes others to become sick. Secondhand smoke can cause cancer and other diseases. Being exposed to secondhand smoke leads to becoming sick even though the victim may be healthy. (Secondhand smoke)
In the United States of America, about 3,000 adults die of secondhand smoke every year. Exposure to secondhand smoke can also cause heart disease and have negative effects on the blood and blood vessels. Deaths caused by secondhand smoke kills 46,000 per year. Because the risk factors from secondhand smoke are very high, public places have put a ban on smoking and have become “smoke free”. Even with the ban, people everywhere suffer from sickness from other sources. (Secondhand Smoke)
When smoking occurs, gases are released through the body around the eyes, nose, and throat. The sections may become irritated and begin to react. Tiny hairs, cilia, clean the lungs and bronchial tubes; but smoking damages the cilia by paralyzing them and sometimes they are even killed. (What happens when you smoke?)
Inside the lungs, cigarette smoke damages the cells that take out all foreign invaders. A good amount of what is inhaled turns to tar. Some of the chemical does go away, but only thirty percent. Seventy percent stays behind and sticks to the throat. The chemicals that are ingested go straight to the blood stream and from the blood steam it goes immediately to the heart. When the chemicals reach the heart the heartbeat increases as much as ten to twenty-five beats per minute. (What happens when you smoke?)
The process of cancer begins when cells divide out of control. Cancer can grow and spread making it difficult to remove during surgery. When cancer spreads, it is mostly due to tumors. Tumors are how cancer is detected. Tumors can be and have been found in many...

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